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learning a craft

by ysoldateague June 01, 2006 3 min read

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I went to the library and took out pretty much every book on knitting technique. Along with some of the books in my (very small) personal knitting library I plan on learning from these. I was horribly dissapointed by Vogue Knitting when I got it a few months ago. There was very little in it that I didn’t already know. I consider myself to be an adventurous, intelligent knitter but I don’t think I’m particularly knowledgable. I was possibly expecting too much from ‘the ultimate knitting book’ but if my expectations were high we only have some of the wonderful people on the internet to thank. I re-taught myself to knit from the ‘Odhams Encyclopedia of Knitting’ as a teenager, without much regard for why a particular increase was right for a particular purpose. (please tell me I did not just use the phrase ‘as a teenager,’ I’m not even 21 yet and still think of myself as about 16 most of the time). I didn’t even look at the diagram for the ‘knit stitch’, mores the pity. My first sweater, camisole and at least 20 hats were all knit with crossed knit stitches. It took me a while to even notice. My first sweater incidentally was from a 1940s pattern. It’s pretty cool but way too warm to actually wear often. It’s soooo 40s though so I wear it when I’m having a certain kind of vintage day. You know, as you do. I only wish it was navy not black – it does have short puffed sleeves and a square neckline. I was so proud of those sleeves, even if I did use yarn overs to increase. You see the Odhams book has a section of increases, the explanation confused me and I just picked one randomly – I didn’t exactly get lucky with that choice huh? The Odhams book has lots of info and some vintagey appeal but as a practical instruction book it is somewhat lacking. Arranged alphabetically within broad sections it begins with blocking, and gets to cables before you cast on. Well you see cabling is before casting on in the alphabet and it is an encyclopedia after all. Stitch n bitch ironed out those issues. The puns got to me after a while but at least I read it and actually looked at the all important knit stitch diagram. Ooooh the yarn goes that way round. But it was the internet that taught me to knit. Or the wonderful people on the internet. The free patterns, the craftster discussions, the wonderful tutorials and technique guides, the explanations of why I might want to do something, not just that I could.I learnt to read my knitting, and to experiment. And if I’m forced to I can knit from a pattern without having to randomly pick an increase method. But I think now it is time for some studying. I can’t wait to know more than I need to. What fun
On a different note has anyone used Kemtex or Fibrecrafts acid dyes, I’m trying to decide which to order.

To change the subject entirely I agreed to go paintballing tomorrow. What on earth have I got myself in for. Haha I’m sure it will be fun, I’m going with 7 guys which makes me by far the smallest target. And I have knitting muscles so shouldering the gun shouldn’t be a problem.

ysoldateague
ysoldateague



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