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by Ysolda support@ysolda.com April 14, 2020 2 min read

In my last post I covered getting started on Glenmore and, if you're following along with these posts, your sweater should look something like this. This example is size 1 so you might have a few more rows than this if you're making a larger size.

In this post we'll look at shaping the neck and joining in the round. The next post in this series will go over splitting for the front and back, making adjustments to the armhole if you need to adjust your sleeve fit, and shaping the underarm.

The neck shaping begins with increases worked 2 sts in from the beginning and end of each right side row (you'll still be increasing on every row at the shoulder markers).

A left leaning lifted increase is worked at the beginning of the row, and a right leaning one at the end.

After working all of the increases for your size it should look like this. Use the stitch counts given in the pattern to double check that you've worked the right number of increases.

Your last row worked will have been a right side row. You'll use the working yarn to work a cable cast on next to the last stitch worked. To work a cable cast on you'll turn the work, so that the last stitch worked is on the left needle, and cast on your new stitches onto the left needle. Here's a tutorial if you haven't worked a cable cast on before.

 

After casting on turn the work back so the right side is facing and the cast on stitches are on the right needle. Slide the stitches at the other end of your work up onto the left needle tip, so the left front shoulder stitches are on the left needle, and the cast on stitches form a bridge between the front shoulder sections.

On the left shoulder stitches you had been working the dot stitch pattern with the right and wrong side rows reversed. You should be able to see that the last row worked was a plain row, so you now need to work a dot row. Follow the pattern directions to work across these stitches in pattern.

Your Glenmore is now joined in the round, and will continue to be worked in the round until the shoulder increases are complete. The marker at the end of the left shoulder stitches will now be your end of round marker.

Join the Glenmore KAL!

You don't have to do anything special to sign up, just buy the pattern and share your progress. Use the hashtag #glenmorekal on instagram, twitter and your Ravelry project, so everyone can see your photos and come and say hi in our Ravelry group. There will be prizes! 

Read all posts in the Glenmore KAL series. 

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Ysolda support@ysolda.com
Ysolda support@ysolda.com

Ysolda designs knitting patterns, spent years teaching at events and loves to find new yarns and books to share.



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