August 25, 2015 by Sarah

This might seem like a strange project to be thinking about in August, but my hands are itching to cast on something quick and chunky. The thrums in Cadeautje (from Ysolda's Knitworthy collection) would also be a great way to use up some of that fibre I set aside for the Tour de Fleece, but that never got anywhere near my spinning wheel! There are so many lovely versions of Cadeautje, and so many options for fun with the thrums, I thought I'd show a few here.

This perfect little pair are amiijjang's Cadeautje, which she knit at a smaller gauge for her nephew.

I don't really need to say much to explain how awesome these are! Debbie made these for her husband so he wouldn't be left out in their family's matching Christmas outfits - the ridiculously cute photo is on SnowWhiteMama's Cadeautje project page.

The lovely colour palette of Traceyalice's Cadeautje makes me feel all warm and cosy, and really excited for autumn knitting.

FrauMascha's Cadeautje are so cute, and they also have a rainbow sole. She used sock yarn held triple, and her project page very helpfully lets you know how many thrums to make for each shoe!

 

Comment

August 18, 2015 by Sarah

This week my mum came to visit, wearing one of the Liesl sweaters I've made her. Seeing knitted gifts being worn and loved always inspires me to knit more, I just need to grow some extra arms! Liesl is a great pattern if you're determined to knit a sweater, but don't have a lot of time. Thanks to the big gauge and open stitch pattern it seems to me that it knits up faster than any other garment. Which is why so far I've made three (or eight if you count wee Liesl)... Here are some other beautiful versions which are making me want to cast on my next one!

Here is Purppura's 1-skein-Liesl, which works as a stunning shrug in Madelinetosh DK.

NarcissaM's amazing version has reminded me too how little yarn Liesl uses - her Liesl was knit with less than two skeins of Malabrigo Worsted.

I just love this Liesl, it was made by Lynn (fidlstix on Ravelry) and is the perfect colour for summer. It's knit in Lion Brand Cotton Ease, and her project notes have some simple tips for a looser fit round the arms.

A beautiful version knit by Rufarocrafty in Caron Simply Soft.

And finally, a close up of picperfic's Handspun Liesl.  Feather and fan patterns look amazing in striping yarn, and even more so in handspun striping yarn. 

If you don't already follow Ysolda on pinterest, her boards are here. In particular, we have one dedicated to Amazing FOs - beautiful projects knitters have made from her patterns.

Comment

August 11, 2015 by Sarah

One of the many, many things I love about Ravelry, is how easy it is to find inspiration. And even if that's not something you're short of, looking through the amazing projects of knitters all over the world is a lovely way to spend a few minutes...um, or hours!

Last month I managed to spend some time at my spinning wheel, as each year I sign up for the Tour de Fleece with good intentions, make a valiant attempt for the first few days and then get distracted by all the lovely spinning that everyone else is doing. This time round, I kept looking through projects of Ysolda's patterns knit with handspun yarn and there so many truly lovely things I thought I'd share a couple here.

Copyright: Fancy Tiger Crafts


Copyright: Fancy Tiger Crafts

Behold! This cosy Blank Canvas was knitted by Jaime from Fancy Tiger Crafts in Denver, in some longwool roving purchased at Rhinebeck. For more details have a look at her project page here.

BrineyDeep's Strokkur


BrineyDeep's Strokkur

There are some really great versions and colour combinations of Strokkur out there in the world, but BrineyDeep's is one of my favourites.  Kirstin spun the yarn, her mum dyed the contrast colours and now she has an awesome sweater that they worked on together.

  Rebecca's Handspun Sugarleaf

 

Rebecca's Handspun Sugarleaf

Some of you might remember seeing this on the blog before, it was knit by our own Rebecca but it's so lovely I hope no-one will mind admiring it again. Her Sugarleaf by Mary-Heather Cogar from The Rhinebeck Sweater was knitted up in yarn spun during a previous Tour de Fleece. The main colour is blue-faced leicester and the blue is corriedale. Oh, and it was spun on a spindle!

Comment

August 07, 2015 by Ysolda Teague

I've run into Susan Crawford in Shetland a few times over the last few years, and every time she's been hurrying to or from the Shetland archive (or roping me into testing her renditions of vintage knitting projects — like a woolly swim suit in the Atlantic in October). I managed to pry a little bit about what she was working on out of her each time, but I was delighted to get a chance to really pick her brain about it in an interview. 

It turns out that Susan spent all of that time in the archive poring over vintage knitting projects, transcribing their stitch patterns and construction stitch by stitch and hunting for any related documentary evidence or living people who could provide context for the project. That investigation has culminated in a book of reproduction multi-size patterns plus the story of each garment and the people who knitted, wore, loved and mended them. 

A note: I went back and forth on whether to format this as audio or video. It's definitely not a documentary (although if Susan has any energy left after the huge book project I'd love to watch one about vintage Shetland knitting!) and you could just listen to it, but in the end I decided video was worth it because it's a chance to see a couple of the pieces from the collection.  

You can find more information about the book and the crowdfunding campaign at www.vintageshetlandproject.pubslush.com


Comment

August 04, 2015 by Sarah

Although summer is officially here, in Scotland it doesn't usually feel that way. It is about as warm as it ever really gets though so here are some lovely laceweight projects to admire, and to tempt you to your needles.

liz4ka's Rainbow Isbhel


liz4ka's Rainbow Isbhel

Crafticum knitted this stunning Ishbel in a laceweight wool, and unsurprisingly, it caught my eye straight away. Have a look at her project page for more details, and to admire it some more!

Copyright: Becks Stunell


Copyright: Becks Stunell

Say hello to the very smiley Becks! She knit her Barley Sugar in Ysolda's Treacle Toffee colour way of Fyberspates Scrumptious Lace. This is a great travel project as its light, lovely and intuitive. And if you drop a stitch in the brioche section, Becks has kindly made an awesome video of how to pick up your stitch! (It's great for other brioche projects too.) All the details are on her project page.

Blocking lace is one of my favourite things, and Maggie's skills for finishing off her Pear Drop are a great example. She describes the shawl, knit in Madelinetosh Prairie as 'a lacy shawl for a fancy gentleman'. And as if you needed another reason to visit her project page, go and have a look at the picture of her cat appreciating her beautiful work!

Many people know what its like to reknit a pattern that you've really enjoyed, or so that you can have something you originally gifted for yourself. Tanya has taken this to another level though, and pictured above is her 7th Laika! If you've been looking for a lightweight sweater that you can easily throw in your bag but also looks smart and fancy, Laika is a great choice. The simply and easy to memorise stitch pattern makes it perfect for summer knitting, which is why its one of the very few garment patterns I've made more than once myself. Seven times though, that's seriously impressive...

projects feature laceweight

Comment

July 10, 2015 by Ysolda Teague

Need a new project to start this weekend or pack on a trip? A lightweight cardigan for cool summer evenings or mornings by a lake? Ishnana is now available. 

A classic feminine cardigan with knitterly details. The back features an organic cable and lace panel that looks deceptively complex. Two options are provided for the stitch patterns on front and sleeves, each of which picks up on different details from the back panel. 

The body is worked from the bottom up in one piece to the underarms, where fronts and back are divided and completed separately. After seaming the shoulders, stitches are picked up around the armhole and the sleeves are worked downwards in the round. The sleeve caps are shaped with short rows using an innovative technique that perfectly resembles the fit and shaping of a traditional set in sleeve. Directions are included for both elbow length and long sleeves. The cardigan is completed with ribbed button and neck bands worked from picked up stitches. 


Comment