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by Laura Chau February 25, 2020 2 min read

Granton and Wardie incorporate an extended version of English tailoring, where all of the shoulder shaping is worked on the upper edge of the back. Single and double decreases are used to decrease quickly on the right side only and are incorporated into a cable twist for a tidy full-fashioned look. You may have seen similar decreases used on commercially knit sweaters. Don't worry if you've never worked a cable without a cable needle before - here's a step by step tutorial to these fun and interesting decreases.

Anita wearing a dark green Granton.

Abbreviations and Direction

CD = (single) cabled decrease
DCD = double cabled decrease
R = right. Worked at the beginning of RS rows.
L = left. Worked at the end of RS rows.

DCDR - Double Cabled Decrease Right

Insert right needle into the fronts of the first and third sts on the left needle.
1. Insert the right needle into the fronts of the first and third sts on the left needle.

Slip the first 3 sts off the left needle. There are 2 sts on the right needle and 1 loose at the back of the work.
2. Slip these 3 stitches off the left needle. There are 2 stitches on the left needle and 1 hanging out loose at the back of the work. I find that using my left thumb and index finger to hold the fabric below the stitches helps with preventing the loose stitch from running.

Place the loose stitch onto the left needle.
3. Place the loose stitch onto the left needle.

Slip 2 sts from right needle to left.
4. Then move the 2 held stitches from the right needle back onto the left needle.

Knit two together twice.
5. K2tog twice. 4 stitches have been decreased to 2.

CDR - Cabled Decrease Right

Insert the right needle tip into the front of the 2nd stitch on the left needle.
1. Insert the right needle into the front of the 2nd stitch on the left needle.

Slip 2 sts off the left needle. One loose stitch is at the back of the work.
2. Slip the first 2 stitches off the left needle. There is one stitch on the right needle and 1 loose stitch at the back of the work.

Pick up the loose stitch with the left needle.
3. Pick up the loose stitch with the left needle.

Slip 1 stitch from right needle to left.
4. Return the stitch from the right needle to the left.

Completed decrease. 3 stitches have been decreased to 2.
5. K1, k2tog. 3 stitches have been decreased to 2.

DCDL - Double Cabled Decrease Left

Insert right needle into the back of the third stitch on the left needle.
1. Insert the right needle into the back of the 3rd stitch on the left needle.

Slip 3 stitches off the left needle.
2. Slip the first 3 stitches off the left needle, holding the fabric below the needle to prevent the loose stitches from budging. There will be 2 loose stitches at the front of the work.

Pick up the loose stitches with the left needle at the front.
3. Pick up the 2 free stitches at the front using the left needle.

Slip 1 st from the right needle to the left.
4. Replace the stitch from the right needle to the left.

Knit two together, SSK.
5. K2tog, ssk. 4 sts decreased to 2.

CDL - Cabled Decrease Left

Insert right needle into the back of the third stitch on the left needle.
1. Insert the right needle into the back of the 3rd st on the left needle.

Slip 3 stitches off the left needle and pick up the 2 loose stitches at the front.
2. Slip the first 3 stitches off the left needle. There will be 2 loose stitches at the front.

Pick up 2 loose stitches with the left needle at the front.
3. Pick up the loose stitches with the left needle at the front.

Slip one stitch from the right needle to the left.
4. Replace the stitch from the right needle to the left.

Knit 2 together, knit 1.
5. K2tog, k1. 3 sts decreased to 2.

Save this tutorial for later on pinterest!

graphic with 5 thumbnail images of cable decreases being worked and the test "how to knit cable decreases"
A Chinese-Canadian woman with glasses smiling at the camera.
Laura Chau

Laura is a Canadian knitter, designer, and editor.



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