March 03, 2020

Granton and Wardie are the cosiest cardigans around. The angled pockets are worked at the full width of the front pieces, and just the right size and angle to slip in your hands (and anything else you might need)!

After working the hem ribbing, you begin shaping the outer layer of the pocket by working a couple of increases for the ribbed pocket edging, then decreasing to the top edge of the pocket to create the angled opening.

Then, stitches are picked up from the wrong side and the inner layer is worked. The two layers are neatly joined with a three needle bind off. Struggling to visualise how this works? Here's our step-by-step photo tutorial!

Shown in Gilliatt in Granit. Get your Granton kit in Gilliatt!

Joining the left pocket Here, the two layers of the pocket have been worked and are ready to be joined. Each layer is on a separate needle and the working yarn is to the right of the pocket lining.

On the pocket lining, knit the number of stitches given in the pattern to get to the pocket join.

With the pocket folded down it looks like this:

Fold the outer layer up and hold the needles parallel with the lining stitches behind.

Join the pocket tops: Insert the right needle into the first stitch on the front needle, then into the first stitch on the back needle. Knit these two stitches together. Knit together the next stitch on each needle in the same way.

You now have 2 purls remaining of the ribbing on the pocket front. We're going to neatly finish the ribbing by knitting the next 2 stitches on the front together with just one stitch on the back.

Begin by inserting the right needle into the next 2 stitches on the front needle, from left to right, then into the 1st stitch on the back needle, and knit all 3 stitches together. Work a 2nd k3tog in the same way, to join the next 2 stitches on the front needle with 1 on the lining.

Continue knitting together one stitch from each needle to end of row.

All the stitches have now been worked onto one needle, ready to continue up the front. The straight center front edges are left open for now, and closed when picking up for the buttonband.

Ready to start your own? Get your Granton kit here and Wardie kit here!



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