October 21, 2021 0 Comments

Lifted increases, also known as raised increases, are created by picking up a loop from a previously created stitch in the row. Lifted increases are subtle and easy to work, making them a great choice for increasing invisibly. When working top down, such as for Glenmoreand The Porty Hat, the stitches between the increases create a lovely defined line.

Scroll down for a video tutorial. 

Right Lifted Increase (RLI)

The Right Lifted increase is worked into the righthand side of a stitch, and is often used before a stitch marker. 

Ysolda's hands with circular needles and grey yarn. One stitch has been knit.

Work in pattern to the increase. You will be working the increase stitch into the right side of the next stitch, before working the stitch itself- this is a Right Lifted Increase (RLI).

Insert right needle tip into the right half of the next stitch.

Insert the right needle tip into the right half of the stitch directly below the left needle.

Place this loop on the left needle.

Open this stitch slightly and place this loop onto the left needle.

Knit this stitch.

Knit into this stitch normally.

Knit the following stitch.

Increase complete.

Right Lifted Increase Purl (RLIP)

Purl to the increase point.

Purl to where you need to increase.

Increase is worked into the purl bump below the left needle.

The increase will be worked into the purl bump directly below the left needle.

Purl directly into the bump or lift it onto the needle, then purl.

You can purl directly into the loop if you wish, or lift it onto the left needle with the leading edge on the right. Purl into this loop.

Left Lifted Increase (LLI) 

The Left Lifted increase is worked into the lefthand side of a stitch, and is often used after a stitch marker.

Identify the row, two rows below the stitch on the right needle.

Using your fingers, open the stitch column slightly to identify the row two rows below the stitch on your right needle.

Insert left needle tip into the purl bump 2 rows below.

Insert the left needle tip into the purl bump below and behind the stitch just worked, and lift this strand onto the left needle.

Knit into this stitch.

Knit into this stitch.

Left Lifted Increase Purl (LLIP) 

Purl to where you need to work the increase. The LLIP will be worked into the second purl bump down from the right needle.

Purl to increase point.
Lift the second purl bump down from the right needle onto the left needle.

Insert the left needle tip into the purl bump from below and lift it onto the needle.

Purl into this loop.

Purl into this loop.

Lifted increases video tutorial

If video suits you better, here's a tutorial we made illustrating these increases. You may well find watching the video and then looking at the still photos works best for you.

lifted increases from Ysolda Teague on Vimeo.

With right and left lifted increases in your personal stitch dictionary, you can substitute lifted increases for m1s or other types of increases whenever you like!

Check out some of our patterns with lifted increases: Glenmore and Inverleith.



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