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by Laura Chau September 03, 2019 3 min read

Welcome to the Inverleith KAL! We're knitting Inverleith, a boxy tee with beautiful drape and a novel construction, between July 15 and September 16, 2019. Jump in anytime and join us on the Ravelry forums for discussion, questions, and chat. Tag your Ravelry project with #inverleithkal to be entered for prize drawing in September!

Ready to cross the finish line? Today we’ll be taking a closer look at Inverleith’s unique sleeve cuff detail, as well as finishing off the neckline.

Working the Neck band

Pick up and knit

Inverleith has a very simple neck treatment. Pick up and knit around the neck using a smaller needle, picking up 1 stitch for each cast on stitch and 3 stitches for every 4 rows along vertical edges. For the A-C sizes, knit 1 round and then bind off (see below).

Picked up neckband on Inverleith

The front neck cast on of D+ sizes is a little bigger than the A-C sizes, so we’ll need to work some decreases across the front neck. The blue markers indicate the front neck increases.

I have 62 stitches between the markers and need to decrease 10 stitches. 60 is the closest multiple of 10, leaving 2 stitches left over. Since 60/10 is 6, we need to work a k2tog for every 6 stitches. K2tog takes up 2 stitches, so this translates to a decrease of (k4, k2tog) 10 times between the markers, then just knit the last 2. If you have more than a couple of stitches left over, you can split them between the 2 ends between the markers.

K2tog Through Back Loop Bind Off

The k2tog tbl bind off is worked similarly to the p2tog bind off on the sleeves.

Knit 2 together through back loop.

Knit the first 2 stitches through the back loop.

Slip the stitch from the right needle to the left.

Slip this stitch from the right needle to the left and work another k2tog tbl.

At the end of the round, pick up the first bound off stitch with the left needle.

Continue all the way around. When you reach the end of the round, pick up the first bound off stitch with the left needle.

P2tog and fasten off.

Bring the yarn to the front, slip the stitch from the right needle to the left, and p2tog. Cut yarn and pull through stitch.

Faux Grafting the Sleeve Cuff

Unrolled sleeve cuff

Here’s the completed sleeve cuff.

Fold the sleeve cuff up so there is a narrow strip of stockinette in the center.

Fold the cuff up so that the reverse stockinette portion shows, with a narrow strip of stockinette in the center. We’re going to secure the bind off edge of the sleeve cuff to the end of the shoulder, using faux grafting/Kitchener stitch. It’s “faux” because it’s a seam that looks like a row of knitting, but doesn’t use any live stitches as grafting generally does.

Insert tapestry needle through the center of the first stitch, from back to front.

Cut a length of yarn (both strands held together) and thread onto a tapestry needle. Come up through the center V of the first stitch on the right of the sleeve cuff, leaving a tail to weave in.

Bring the needle behind both legs of the first stitch on the shoulder.

Step 1. Bring the needle behind both legs of the corresponding V on the shoulder side.

Insert needle back into the same stitch on the sleeve cuff, then out through the next stitch.

Step 2. To complete the stitch, insert the needle back into the center of the first stitch, then out through the center of the next stitch.

One completed sewn stitch.

Repeat 1 and 2 to the end of the stockinette stitches, ending with the yarn in the center of the last stitch.

Completed sleeve graft.

Now all that's left is weaving in the ends and a good blocking! See you back soon for a finished project roundup and prizes!

Laura Chau

Laura is a Canadian knitter, designer, and editor.



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