May 01, 2020

Two images. Image on left a white woman leans against a brick wall, she's got blond chin length curly hair and glasses. She's wearing dark grey jeans, a tshirt, and a blue cardigan open it has pockets. Image on the right a black woman with an afro leans against a wall wearing the same cardigan over a black t-shirt.

I love my original blue Wardie so much decided to make a new one in Finull PT2 colour 405, but wanted a slightly different style to wear around the house with pjs or leggings. I stalled out on what to do with the buttonband as I knew I didn’t want it to have buttons. I’m not really a cardigan person and much prefer pullovers.

Two people stand in a muddy alley, both wearing button up v-neck cardigans with pockets. The person in the foreground is dark skinned with a close cropped dark hair. They're wearing denim jeans and a denim button up with a bow tie under a dark green cardigan. The person standing slightly behind is white, taller with a dark bob, she is wearing mustard tights, a black denim skirt and a blue polka dot button up with a bow at the neck, under a grey cardigan.

When we were developing Granton I was inspired by the picked up ribbing and decided that was the way to go for this version, leaving out the buttonholes.

A black woman with an afro, stand in front of an open balcony door holding a white coffee mug. She's wearing a grey cardigan with a wide ribbed band, and pockets over a black jumpsuit.

I followed the directions as written until the button band section.

Overhead shot of Wardie, the shoulder is seamed together and the sleeve has been picked up. You can see the other front in a yellow project bag.

How I did the band

Using a long circular needle 1 size smaller than the smaller needle in the pattern (I used a 2.75mm), pick up and knit sts around front edge, approx 2 sts for every 3 rows on front edges and 1 stitch for every stitch across the back of the neck. Check the total is a multiple of 4 and adjust if necessary by working p2togs on first row.

Row 1 (WS): p3, (k2, p2) to 1 st before end, p1.
Row 2: k3, (p2, k2) to 1 st before end, k1.

I repeated those 2 rows 13 times until I had approximately 2½" / 6.5cm of ribbing. I was aiming for 3" /7.5cm but ran out of yarn, but I’m really happy with the length it is.

Then bind off in pattern. I blocked the cardigan flat as shown in the photo and then seamed it together.

Overhead shot of Wardie before seaming. The knitting is spread out flat over two towels on the floor.

My grey Wardie turned out exactly like I'd been imagining. I wear it all the time, when I go out to my allotment in the evening to do some watering, in the morning over my pjs when I'm having my morning coffee (I don't look as elegant as Aja when I have my morning coffee!), or in the evenings when I'm knitting and watching TV, in fact I'm wearing it as I work on this post. 

A black woman with her hair tied up on top of her head, leans against and open balcony door she got her eyes closed and looks blissful, her hands are in the cardigan pockets. She's wearing a grey cardigan with a wide ribbed band, and pockets over a black jumpsuit.

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