Thrums!

by ysoldateague September 29, 2014 2 min read

I was going to put this up last Thursday but somehow it’s already Monday. Not quite sure how that happened! The nice part is it’s now perfectly timed so that you can cast on a fun thrummed project — I just released Cadeautje, the third pattern in the Knitworthy collection. 

Use a non-superwash wool that feels nice and soft to you. It’s important not to use a superwash fibre because over time you want the thrums to felt together on the inside into an even blanket. Superwash fibres won’t felt together and could fall out. Merino, BFL and Shetland are all ideal and easy to find. It’s easier to make the thrums from combed top but carded batts or roving will give a lovely fluffy effect once you manage to separate somewhat even pieces! 

Hold the end of the fibre in one hand and grip further down the length with the other, hands about shoulder width apart. Gently pull to separate a length around 8″ long. 

Pinch off a wee bit of fibre from this length — about a 1/4″ wide. Pull the ends gently to tease it and fluff up the fibres a bit. 

Fold the ends into the middle so they overlap just a bit. 

Keep repeating this process until you have a nice big pile. They go fast once you start incorporating them into a project and stopping to make them one by one is no fun. 

When it's time to add a thrum insert the needle into the stitch and wrap the yarn as normal.
When it’s time to add a thrum insert the needle into the stitch and wrap the yarn as normal.
Pinch the ends of the thrum together with the yarn and complete the stitch.
Pinch the ends of the thrum together with the yarn and complete the stitch.
The inside is almost like a sheepskin
The inside is almost like a sheepskin
Lay the thrum across the needle, alongside the working yarn.
Lay the thrum across the needle, alongside the working yarn.
On the following row treat the thrum and working yarn as one stitch and work into them together. 
On the following row treat the thrum and working yarn as one stitch and work into them together. 
and the outside has a cute lice pattern. The thrums can be worked in various patterns or try playing with coloured stripes. 
and the outside has a cute lice pattern. The thrums can be worked in various patterns or try playing with coloured stripes. 
ysoldateague
ysoldateague



Also in Blog

How to Kitchener Stitch
How to Kitchener Stitch

by Laura Chau December 09, 2021 3 min read 0 Comments

Kitchener stitch is a knitting technique used for grafting together two sets of live stitches, most often stockinette stitch. Instead of binding off and sewing two edges together, you can use a tapestry needle and yarn to join the stitches completely seamlessly.
Read More
Crochet Provisional Cast-on
Crochet Provisional Cast-on

by Laura Chau December 02, 2021 3 min read 0 Comments

The crochet provisional cast-on is easy to work and unzips perfectly every time! A provisional cast-on can be used anytime you want to pick up live stitches from your cast-on edge, either to knit in the opposite direction from or to create a seamless kitchener stitch join.
Read More
Learn to knit: How to knit in the round with double pointed needles
Learn to knit: How to knit in the round with double pointed needles

by Laura Chau November 25, 2021 4 min read 0 Comments

Read More